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Looking for curable in entire archive - Found 26 matches in 26 files
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Stay Away from Nicholas Bachynsky, Intra-Cellular Hyperthermia (ICHT), and 2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP), 30/8/2014
ICHT using another chemical has been offered in the United States by T.R. Shantha, M.D., another former Bachynsky associate who operated Integrated Chemotherapy Specialists in Stockbridge, Georgia. (The Georgia medical board Web site lists him as Totada R. Shanthaveerappa, M.D.) One of Shantha's Web sites offered a long list of dubious methods "for the treatment of cancers and other curable and incurable diseases" and has stated: "We treat all kinds of chronic, incurable diseases with success!" Another of his sites claimed that, "We are the most advanced clinic in North America using multiple modalities to restore the immune system, provide quality of life, eradication of cancer, or at the very least provide disease control." . I saw nothing in his description of treatment methods that supported any of these claims. In 2004, Shantha phoned me twice to ask that I remove his name from Quackwatch, saying that he was a respectable practitioner and "not a quack." He made a variety of claims about hyperthermia that I asked him to substantiate. I replied with a series of questions that he promised to answer but never did.

http://www.quackwatch.org/11Ind/gerber.html, 15/9/2014
This case was initiated by an independent oncologist who treated a former Gerber patient in her terminal phase, when her uterine cancer had metastasized widely. The central issue in this case was Gerber's unconventional treatment of the patient when she was first diagnosed. The oncologist believed that Gerber, while practicing as a self-described "orthomolecular practitioner," inappropriately treated a potentially curable patient for 27 months with Hoxsey herbs, megavitamins, chelation therapy, Wobe Mugos enzymes, Chaparral tea, pangamic acid, benzaldehyde, wheatgrass juice, coffee or enzyme enemas, apricot pits, red clover, and slippery elm .

Why You Should Stay Away from Insulin Potentiation Therapy, 31/8/2013
IPT's promoters use vague and misleading language to make it seem legitimate. It is not. When examined even casually, the claimed "cures" are bogus. Besides the danger of insulin shock and death, using the wrong chemotherapeutic agent(s) or doses that are too low can foster the development of resistant cancer cell strains. Thus, IPT can prevent appropriate chemotherapy from working later and make an otherwise curable cancer incurable.

Unnaturalistic Methods: S, 4/6/1997
Schuessler held that all curable diseases were curable with minuscule "doses" of one or more of a dozen inorganic compounds, called "cell salts" or "tissue salts": the fluoride, phosphate, and sulfate salts of calcium; the chloride, phosphate, and sulfate salts of sodium and potassium; the phosphate salts of iron and magnesium; and silicon dioxide.

A Trip to Stonesville:Some Notes on Andrew Weil, M.D., 29/6/2014
That people usually "get better," that most relatively minor diseases heal spontaneously or seem to improve with simple common remedies, is hardly news. Every physician, indeed every grandmother, knows that. Yet before we accept Weil's contention that serious illnesses such as "bone cancer," "Parkinson's disease," or "scleroderma" are similarly curable, or respond to alternative healing methods, we need at least to have some convincing medical evidence that the patients whom he reports in these testimonials did indeed suffer from these diseases, and that they were really improved or healed. The perplexity is not that Weil is using "anecdotes" as proof, but that we don't know whether the anecdotes are true.

The Death of Lorie Atikian (1987), 18/4/2014
The herbalist was a very impressive man. He just glowed with health and was very charismatic, very jovial, charming, friendly, very nice, very knowledge-able. There was not a question that you could ask that he would not have an answer for. And he told a lot of stories about people who had come to see him and been cured by following his course of treatment. It's a very difficult thing to communicate just how mesmerizing this man was. He was so good, so positive. He just exuded this powerful aura about him. He told my father that his cancer was completely curable.

Be Wary of the National Health Federation (1993), 31/7/2013
NHF also assisted the parents of Joey Hofbauer, an eight-year-old boy with Hodgkin's disease, a form of cancer usually curable in its early stages. In 1977, New York State authorities sought custody of Joey because his parents chose laetrile over effective treatment for the boy. With NHF attorney Kirkpatrick Dilling representing the parents, the court ruled that they were "concerned and loving" and "not neglectful" in rejecting conventional treatment. After eighteen months of laetrile and megavitamin treatment from Michael Schachter, M.D. (a New York psychiatrist who occasionally lectures at NHF conventions), Joey was moved to the Bahamas for another type of questionable treatment. He died in 1980 with lungs full of tumors.

Lyme Disease: Questionable Diagnosis and Treatment, 21/1/2013
The fact that Lyme disease is readily curable has not discouraged the formation of over a hundred support groups and nonprofit foundations, some with ties to intravenous services, Lyme diagnostic labs, and physicians specializing in private Lyme disease practices. These groups and their ardent followers have used the Internet and other media to barrage politicians and the general public with misinformation, dire personal stories, rumors, and exaggerated claims about thousands of people being maimed, killed and bankrupted each year by Lyme disease. The core message is that Lyme is a deadly chronic disease that requires long-term antibiotic therapy paid for by insurance companies.

Top Health Frauds, 28/3/2011
These clinics, many of them in Mexico, promise miracle cures. Treatments use unproven and ineffective substances such as Laetrile (derived from apricot kernels) and vitamins and minerals. People who go to these clinics often abandon legitimate cancer treatments. This is particularly tragic in the case of young children because some of their cancers (such as leukemia or Hodgkin's disease) are highly curable through legitimate treatment.

Eye-Related Quackery, 20/12/2009
Contrary to scientific fact, Bates taught that errors of refraction are due, not to the basic shape of the eyeball or the structure of the lens, but to a functional and therefore curable derangement in the action of the muscles on the outside of the eyeball. All defects in vision, he said, were caused by eyestrain and nervous tension; and perfect vision could be achieved by relaxing the eyes completely. Bates warned that eyeglasses cause the vision to deteriorate; he also deplored the use of sunglasses. Bates claimed his exercises could correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia (the inability of older people to focus their eyes on nearby objects). They could also cure such diseases as cataracts, eye infections, glaucoma, and macular degeneration.

Paintracking Home Page, 24/11/2008
Quackwatch: As with any condition that is not curable, unscrupulous treatments abound.

Why Quackery Persists, 10/6/2008
A special case has been made that patients with ''terminal'' disease should have ready access to quack remedies. The argument is appealing but specious. Should swindlers be allowed to "comfort" terminal patients by selling them phony stock—telling them it will make them rich before they die—on the theory that they don't need their money anyway? Moreover, even if it were possible to pinpoint the terminal state (which it usually is not), there is no way to open the door for one group of patients without opening it for others. The Supreme Court recognized this fact when it ruled unanimously in 1979 in a laetrile case that no exception to the 1962 efficacy law should be made for so-called terminal cancer patients. Congress, the high court ruled, had not intended to protect only those suffering from curable diseases.

The Shady History of Royal Lee and Standard Process Laboratories, 5/2/2008
From 1961 through 1965, Lee received help in "research development and marketing" from Kurt W. Donsbach, D.C., who did literature research and gave nutrition seminars, primarily to chiropractors who were interested in marketing the company's products to their patients . In 1962, Lee and Vitamin Products were convicted of misbranding 115 special dietary products by making false claims for the treatment of more than 500 diseases and conditions. Lee received a one-year suspended prison term and was fined $7,000. Lee also consented to a permanent injunction prohibiting his use of claims for the products as well as claims such as "Arthritis and tooth decay are caused by the eating of cooked foods"and "Some 700,000 people a year die of preventable and curable heart disease caused by deficiency of natural vitamins."

Dubious Aspects of Osteopathy, 20/4/2007
Andrew Taylor Still, MD (1828-1917) originally expressed the principles of osteopathy in 1874, when medical science was in its infancy. A medical doctor, Still believed that diseases were caused by mechanical interference with nerve and blood supply and were curable by manipulation of "deranged, displaced bones, nerves, muscles—removing all obstructions—thereby setting the machinery of life moving." His autobiography states that he could "shake a child and stop scarlet fever, croup, diphtheria, and cure whooping cough in three days by a wring of its neck."

OTA Report: Index, 14/1/2006
The Cancer Prevention Diet, 60, 61, 62, 64 The Cancer Survivors and How They Did It, 138, 157 A Cancer Therapy: Results of Fifty Cases, 45, 47, 48 Cancer? Think Curable: The Gerson Therapy, 48 Cancer Victors Journal, 170 Cascara, 78 Case histories

OTA Report: References, 13/1/2006
387. Haught, S.J., Cancer? Think Curable. The Gerson Therapy (Bonita, CA: Gerson Institute, 1983) (introduction and footnotes by N. Fritz), (previous title: Has Dr. Max Gerson a True Cancer Cure? (London, England: London Press, 1962)).

OTA Report: Dietary Treatments, 13/1/2006
The vice president of the Gerson Institute, Norman Fritz, republished a book by S.J. Haught (the pen name for Robert Lichello, a writer for the National Enquirer in the 1950s), which was originally titled Has Dr. Max Gerson a True Cancer Cure? (1962), renaming it Cancer? Think Curable! The Gerson Therapy (1983). In his introduction to the revised edition, Fritz claims that the Gerson treatment "can save about 50 percent or more of advanced 'hopeless' cancer patients" and that "the percentage who recover can exceed 90 percent for early cancers and some 'early terminal' cancers." Fritz's claims are apparently not made by others in the Gerson Institute, but the Haught book is still widely available to patients and is one of the most easily accessible sources of information about the treatment (401). The Gerson Institute's newsletter often describes case histories of patients believed to be cured through the Gerson treatment (see, e.g., a description of "cure of a partially removed, inoperable, radiation-resistant, adult astrocytoma through the Gerson Therapy" (327)).

OTA Report: Regulation of Practitionerss, 13/1/2006
Michael Gerber, MD. —This case was initiated by an independent oncologist who treated a former Gerber patient in her terminal phase, when her uterine cancer had metastasized widely. The central issue in this case was Gerber's unconventional treatment of the patient when she was first diagnosed. The oncologist believed that Gerber, while practicing as a self-described "orthomolecular practitioner," inappropriately treated a potentially curable patient for 27 months with Hoxsey herbs, megavitamins, chelation therapy, Wobe Mugos enzymes, Chaparral tea, pangymic acid, benzaldehyde, wheatgrass juice, coffee or enzyme enemas, apricot pits, red clover, and slippery elm (832).

OTA Report: Laws and Regulations, 13/1/2006
Two court cases concerning the use of laetrile have addressed the issue of parents' rights to choose an unapproved treatment for their child, both of whom had cancers that, in all probability, were curable with appropriate mainstream treatment. In both cases, the State requested that courts declare the children wards of the State, arguing that the parents' actions constituted parental neglect. However, the circumstances surrounding the parents' decisions led the courts to different opinions (525,692). In Massachusetts, Chad Green, a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia, was declared a ward of the State when his parents stopped his chemotherapy while he was in remission and put him on what they called a metabolic therapy (laetrile and a nutritional regimen). Though his parents had already left the State with Chad, the State Supreme Court upheld a court order requiring he receive State-supervised chemotherapy and cease taking the unapproved treatment. The court acknowledged that parents have natural rights that encompass a private family life, but viewed the child's well-being as an overriding interest. The court based its decision of what was in the child's best interest on strong medical evidence that the unconventional treatment was not improving the child's condition, while, until the parents stopped treatments, conventional treatment had controlled the leukemia. It found the nutritional therapy "useless and dangerous" (692). Chad Green died in Mexico shortly after his parents took him there for unconventional treatment (627).

OTA Report: Summary and Policy Options, 13/1/2006
Some cases have come to light when parents have made that decision for a minor child and legal proceedings against the parents have ensued. A highly publicized case in the late 1970's of this type involved a child with potentially curable leukemia, whose parents decided to forgo chemotherapy for laetrile (see chapter 10 for a discussion of this case). Some unconventional practitioners have been charged criminally with discouraging people, who later died of progressive cancer, from seeking possibly curative treatment, or for failing to encourage them to seek such treatment (see ch. 11).

Colloidal Minerals: Unnecessary and Potentially Hazardous, 17/12/2003
Cystic fibrosis is preventable and 100% curable in its early stages. This statement is completely unfounded.

Naturopathic Misrepresentations, 30/8/2002
"There is increasing evidence that diabetes is both induced and curable by clinical nutrition."

Book Review: Textbook of Natural Medicinen, 10/4/2002
C) The chapter on high blood pressure says nothing about the diagnostic work up that is often needed to rule out certain curable causes (such as certain diseases of the adrenal gland, or obstruction in the aorta or the renal arteries). It recommends diet lifestyle changes and the use of herbs but admits that severe cases unresponsive to these "natural" measures may require treatment with pharmaceuticals (presumably under the management of a conventional medical doctor). However, it ends with the dangerous advice that once control of high blood pressure has been achieved with drugs, the naturopathic physician should have the patient "taper off " the medications. For some such patients, a reduction in medication risks sudden resurgence of severe hypertension and the possibility of a stroke or heart attack. Most patients with severe hypertension need to remain on medication indefinitely, or for many years.

The Grape Cure, 3/11/2001
The 1971 American Cancer Society report noted that by 1950, the the Centre was no longer listed in the telephone directory and a letter sent to its last known address had been returned as undeliverable. A note about the Grape Cure in the book, Is Cancer Curable? published in 1954, stated that at that time Johanna Brandt was a missionary in South Africa .

Dubious Aspects of Osteopathy, 7/12/1998
Andrew Taylor Still, MD (1828-1917) originally expressed the principles of osteopathy in 1874, when medical science was in its infancy. A medical doctor, Still believed that diseases were caused by mechanical interference with nerve and blood supply and were curable by manipulation of "deranged, displaced bones, nerves, muscles -- removing all obstructions -- thereby setting the machinery of life moving." His autobiography states that he could "shake a child and stop scarlet fever, croup, diphtheria, and cure whooping cough in three days by a wring of its neck."


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