Webglimpse Search Results:

Looking for hormones in entire archive - Found 109 matches in 74 files
Showing results 1 - 25


Saliva Testing for Hormones, 27/7/2002
Saliva Testing for Hormones

Saliva Testing for Hormones

Hormones would not pass the basement membranes of the salivary duct system without active transport. I can find no indication of any such active transport in salivary glands.

The lab claims to test DHEA, testosterone, estriol, estradiol, estrone, progesterone, testosterone, and androstenedione. I cannot find any "normal" levels for any of these substances in the literature for saliva. Nor can I find any correlations between salivary levels and blood levels. There is no indication of what the lab inteprets as abnormal values. There are a series of check boxes of symptoms that supposedly can be confired by saliva testing for hormones.

Since testing for these hormones in serum are both accurate and straightforward, with published and well established normal values, the only reason I can see for any saliva testing would be to avoid taking a blood sample. A laboratory or doctor's office would probably refuse to draw a sample to be sent to a lab of this nature. So the alternative is to self-provide a saliva sample.

Dietary Supplements, Herbs, and Hormones, 24/8/2005
Dietary Supplements, Herbs, and Hormones

"Dietary Supplements," Herbs, and Hormones

The most logical definition of "dietary supplement" would be something that supplies one or more essential nutrients missing from the diet. However, the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 -- commonly referred to as DSHEA -- defines "dietary supplement" as any product (except tobacco) that contains at least one of the following: (1) a vitamin, (2) a mineral, (3) an herb or botanical, (4) an amino acid, (5) a dietary substance "for use to supplement the diet by increasing total dietary intake," or (6) any concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or combination of any of the aforementioned ingredients. Herbs ,of course, are not consumed for a nutritional purpose and often are marketed with therapeutic claims. The supplement industry, which lobbied vigorously for passage of this act, included them in this definition to weaken the FDA's ability to regulate their marketing. Since DSHEA's passage, hormones have also been marketed as "dietary supplements."

Hormones

Desiccated Thyroid: Be Wary of Doctors Who Prescribe It, 10/9/2013
Desiccated thyroid extract, made from dried animal glands, was the most common form of treatment for hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels) before the individual thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) were discovered and became commercially available. During the 1960s, science-based physicians stopped using it because its potency can vary from batch to batch, which would make it harder to optimize the patient's thyroid hormone levels. Today, desiccated thyroid—also called Armour ThyroidŽ—is made from pig thyroid glands by Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a subsidiary of Forest Laboratories, Inc., of St. Louis.

While desiccated thyroid contains both T4 and T3, the balance of T4 and T3 in animals is not the same as in humans, so the hormones in animal thyroid pills aren’t necessarily “natural” for the human body. Further, the amounts of both T4 and T3 can vary in every batch of desiccated thyroid, making it harder to keep blood levels right. Finally, even desiccated thyroid pills have chemicals (binders) in them to hold the pill together, so they are not completely “natural”. Desiccated animal thyroid is rarely prescribed today, and there is no evidence that desiccated thyroid has any advantage over synthetic T4 .

A. Armour Thyroid contains both thyroxine (T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3) extracted from the thyroid gland of pigs. One grain, about 60 mg, of desiccated pig thyroid extract contains about 38mcg of T4 and 9mcg of T3, a ratio of around 4 to 1. The normal concentration of these hormones in the human thyroid is, however, at a ratio of 14 to 1. In other words, Armour thyroid extract contains excessive amounts of T3 relative to T4 when used to replace thyroid hormone in man. Moreover, as pig thyroid contains other substances apart from T4 and T3, Armour Thyroid is not a pure preparation of thyroid hormones. Historically, extracts of animal thyroid glands were the only way to treat thyroid underactivity, but since the 1950s pure synthetic thyroid hormones have been available in tablet form (thyroxine sodium and liothyronine ).

B. The concentration of thyroid hormones in Armour Thyroid USP is regulated by the manufacturer to United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards. Despite this, there have been significant problems with the stability of Armour Thyroid in recent years, prompting a massive recall of tablets . Because of these stability problems with Armour Thyroid, there is potential for fluctuations in thyroid hormone levels in the blood of patients treated with Armour Thyroid. These fluctuations may be unpredictable and have adverse effects on patients’ health.

A. There is no currently available tablet preparation containing thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine (T4/T3) in a combination that adequately reproduces the relative quantities of these hormones produced by the human thyroid gland. Neither is there a preparation that produces a sustained release of thyroid hormones in a pattern similar to that from the human thyroid gland.

E. The BTA keeps an open mind about whether using an appropriate formulation of T4/T3 combination tablet would, in the future, provide health and quality of life benefits in the treatment of hypothyroidism for a subgroup of patients. However, based on the current evidence from rigorous studies of large numbers of patients using the currently available formulations of synthetic thyroid hormones, combined T4/T3 cannot be recommended because of a lack of benefit and a small number of undesirable and harmful effects seen on combination treatment.

Because synthetic hormones are more reliable, the prescription of desiccated thyroid should be considered a sign of poor medical judgment. Even worse, from what I have seen, many doctors who prescribe it are prone to misdiagnose and overtreat patients in other ways. My advice is very simple: If you encounter anyone who prescribes desiccated thyroid extract, head for the nearest exit.

OTA Report: Pharmacologic and Biologic Treatments, 13/1/2006
Proponents of cellular treatment believe that embryonic and fetal animal tissue contains active therapeutic agents distinct from vitamins, minerals, hormones, or enzymes, and "the fact that these active agents have not yet been identified seems of little consequence" (261). Kuhnau claims that cellular treatment "stimulate weak organ function and regenerate its cellular structure" (489). Proponents claim that cellular treatment is accepted by the body because "embryonic cells from unborn animals...are immunologically inactive and hence not recognized as 'nonself' by the patient's immune system" (238). It is stated that the cellular treatment using cells from endocrine organs "harmonize hormones... balance the intricate hormone-producing and feedback mechanisms of the endocrine system" (238). Cellular treatment is also claimed to stimulate the immune system.

Since the 1940s, one of the agents Revici has frequently used to treat patients classified as having a sterol predominance is lipid-bound selenium. Revici reportedly has used many different preparations of selenium, such as "T Sel" (selenium bound to "eleostearic acid," "Rel" ("a mixture of a 7-carbon diselenide and 3-heptanone") (513), and hexyldiselenide (741). Other substances used to treat this classification of patients include: fatty acids (including some isolated from human and animal sources), sulfur compounds (e.g., colloidal sulfur, sodium thiosulfate), hydrines (e.g., epichlorohydrin), aldehydes, male hormones (testosterone), and mustard compounds (513).

cholesterol), alcohols (e.g., butanol, glycerol, heptanol, octanol), female hormones (estrogens), amines (e.g. aminobutanol), nicotinic acid derivatives, metals (mercury, iron, bismuth), and halogens (e.g., iodine) (747).

As a means of presenting Revici's overall clinical experience in cancer treatment, a descriptive study of clinical outcomes in all the cancer patients treated with the Revici regimen between 1946 and 1955 was summarized in an unpublished paper (741). The paper was written by Robert Ravich, M.D., who worked closely with Revici at the Institute of Applied Biology and who, with Revici, treated the patients described in the report. Most of the patients were reported as "far advanced' or "terminal" and had had previous treatment (e.g., surgery, radiation, hormones, and nitrogen mustard). Cases included in the report were limited to those whose diagnosis of cancer was "clearly established by the best available means, by qualified physicians, surgeons and pathologists not connected with the Institute of Applied Biology" but otherwise were not selectively included or excluded, since the report was intended to describe the entire population of patients treated by Revici during that time.

DHEA: Ignore the Hype, 28/1/2004
News reports have called DHEA "the mother of all hormones." A new book calls it a "superhormone." On the Internet, it's billed as the "fountain of youth hormone."

"Selling potent steroid hormones in health food stores or by mail could be a disaster in the making. DHEA should be classified as an investigational drug and used only in clinical research until we figure out what it does and its side effects," says Peter Hornsby, PhD, associate professor of cell biology at Baylor College of Medicine. His team has just identified the body's DHEA-making cells.

By definition, hormones are chemical messengers made in a gland or tissue that start, stop, or otherwise orchestrate activity in some other issue. That makes DHEA a hormone in name only, since no one knows exactly what it does in the body. For years it was thought to be a kind of chemical trash left over from making other hormones. Today, "we still haven't been able to identify any mechanism of action," says Dr. Casson.

In fact, about the only thing that researchers can agree on is that DHEA is easily converted into other hormones, especially estrogen and testosterone.

A Skeptical Look at St. John's Wort, 20/9/2011
"Dietary Supplements," Herbs, and Hormones

The most logical definition of "dietary supplement" would be something that supplies one or more essential nutrients missing from the diet. However, the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994—commonly referred to as DSHEA—defines "dietary supplement" as any product (except tobacco) that contains at least one of the following: (1) a vitamin, (2) a mineral, (3) an herb or botanical, (4) an amino acid, (5) a dietary substance "for use to supplement the diet by increasing total dietary intake," or (6) any concentrate, metabolite, constituent, extract, or combination of any of the aforementioned ingredients. Herbs ,of course, are not consumed for a nutritional purpose and often are marketed with therapeutic claims. The supplement industry, which lobbied vigorously for passage of this act, included them in this definition to weaken the FDA's ability to regulate their marketing. Since DSHEA's passage, hormones have also been marketed as "dietary supplements."

Hormones

Position Statement on Human Aging, 8/8/2011
Hormones

A number of hormones, including growth hormone, testosterone, estrogen and progesterone, have been shown in clinical trials to improve some of the physiological changes associated with human aging . Under the careful supervision of physicians, some hormone supplements can be beneficial to the health of some people. No hormone, however, has been proved to slow, stop or reverse aging. Instances of negative side effects associated with some of these products have already been observed, and recent animal studies suggest that the use of growth hormone could have a life-shortening effect . Hormone supplements now being sold under the guise of antiaging medicine should not be used by anyone unless they are prescribed for approved medical uses.

Since recorded history individuals have been, and are continuing to be, victimized by promises of extended youth or increased longevity by using unproven methods that allegedly slow, stop or reverse aging. Our language on this matter must be unambiguous: there are no lifestyle changes, surgical procedures, vitamins, antioxidants, hormones or techniques of genetic engineering available today that have been demonstrated to influence the processes of human aging . We strongly urge the general public to avoid buying or using products or other interventions from anyone claiming that they will slow, stop or reverse aging. If people, on average, are going to live much longer than is currently possible, then it can only happen by adding decades of life to people who are already likely to live for 70 years or more. This "manufactured survival time" will require modifications to all of the processes that contribute to aging--a technological feat that, though theoretically possible, has not yet been achieved. What medical science can tell us is that because aging and death are not programmed into our genes, health and fitness can be enhanced at any age, primarily through the avoidance of behaviors (such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, excessive exposure to sun, and obesity) that accelerate the expression of age-related diseases and by the adoption of behaviors (such as exercise and a healthy diet) that take advantage of a physiology that is inherently modifiable .

Some Notes on BodyBalance and Its Test Kits, 21/8/2006
FemaleCheck, which uses a saliva sample to assess levels of the hormones estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone.

StressCheck, which assesses the levels of the hormones DHEA and cortisol in the body.

MaleCheck monitors the hormones testosterone and DHEA.

Quackwatch, 9/12/2014
"Bio-Identical" Hormones (updated 1/19/08)

Dietary Supplements, Herbs, and Hormones (index to many articles) FEATURE TOPIC

Regulatory Actions Related to the Use of Desiccated (Armour) Thyroid, 9/11/2013
Desiccated thyroid extract, made from dried animal glands, was the most common form of treatment for hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels) before the individual thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) were discovered and became commercially available. During the 1960s, science-based physicians stopped using it because its potency can vary from batch to batch, which would make it harder to optimize the patient's thyroid hormone levels.

Practitioners who prescribe desiccated thyroid typically diagnose "hypothyroidism" (underactive thyroid gland) in people with normal thyroid function. Many of these doctor base their diagnosis on "low" temperature readings determined by placing the thermometer under the armpit. This is not a valid test of thyroid function. Proper diagnosis requires blood tests that measure thyroid hormone levels. Because synthetic hormones are more reliable, the prescription of desiccated thyroid should be considered a sign of poor judgment. Even worse, from what I have seen, many practitioners who prescribe it are prone to misdiagnose and overtreat patients in other ways.

Why You Should Stay Away from Insulin Potentiation Therapy, 31/8/2013
Proposed. Uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells is stimulated by a number of growth factors, including insulin (which stimulates energy uptake) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II (which stimulate cell division and growth). There are many more receptors for these hormones on the cell membranes of cancer cells than there are in normal cells. And some cancer cells actually secrete these hormones themselves, resulting in still faster growth. More insulin receptors means more insulin effect, so more drug will enter cancer cells due to the various mechanisms already outlined. This allows the drug to be given in a smaller dose, far less toxic to normal cells, while building up lethally toxic concentrations in cancer cells. Thus the growth mechanism of the cancer cell is used against it in IPT.

Some Notes on "Anti-Aging" Programs, 11/12/2012
It might even turn out that lower growth-hormone levels are an indicator of health. Research findings indicate that mice that overproduce growth hormones live only a short time, suggesting that growth-hormone deficiency itself does not cause accelerated aging, but that the opposite may be true. The the risk/benefit ratios for testosterone replacement and GH treatment have not been established in older persons, and trials of DHEA have failed to show significant clinical benefits in normal aging.

It is important to study substances that might have favorable effects upon the promotion of health (such as the possibility that some anabolic hormones might protect, if only for a short term, against the frailties of old age). However, it is not proper to market such substances with unsubstantiated claims. Moreover, there is no FDA supervision to assure that hormonal products marketed as "dietary supplements" are safe or effective or even contain the ingredients listed on their labels.

"Organic" Foods: Certification Does Not Protect Consumers, 16/4/2012
Food grown without pesticides; grown without artificial fertilizers; grown in soil whose humus content is increased by the additions of organic matter, grown in soil whose mineral content is increased by the application of natural mineral fertilizers; has not been treated with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics, etc.

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; petroleum-based fertilizers or sewage sludge-based fertilizers; bio-engineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too .

FTC Dietary Supplement Advertising Cases 1984 to July 2003, 5/6/2011
AST Nutritional Concepts and Research, Inc., et al. (Civ. No. 99-WY-2197, U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado)(May 4, 2000)(Permanent Injunction)(Alleged unsubstantiated safety claims made for purported body-building supplements that contain androstenedione, “androgen,” and other steroid hormones, and in some cases, stimulants.

Met-RX USA, Inc., et al., (Civ. No. SACV99-1407 DOC(ANX), U.S. District Court for the Central District of California)(Nov. 24, 1999)(Stipulated Final Order For Permanent Injunction and Other Equitable Relief)Unsubstantiated safety claims made for purported body-building supplements that contain androstenedione,“androgen,” and other steriod hormones, and in some cases, stimulants.

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A Spurious Diagnosis, 19/3/2011
A variety of other chemicals, hormones, food extracts, and other natural substances may be prescribed as "neutralizing" agents.

In 1986, Abba I. Terr, M.D., an allergist affiliated with Stanford University Medical Center, reported on 50 patients who had been treated by clinical ecologists for an average of two years. Most of these patients had made a workers' compensation claim for industrial illness. Their treatments included dietary changes (74% of the patients), food or chemical extracts (62%), an antifungal drug (24%), and oxygen given with a portable apparatus (14%). Fourteen of the patients had been advised to relocate to a rural area, and a few were given vitamin and mineral supplements, gamma globulin, interferon, female hormones, and/or oral urine. Despite treatment, 26 patients reported no lessening of symptoms, 22 felt worse, and only 2 had improved .

Nicholas Gonzalez Treatment for Cancer, 11/9/2009
An excess of female hormones brings about this change. Both men and women have sex hormones and when the delicate male-female sex hormone balance is upset, a cancer starts. Thus cancer is the growth of normal tissue, i.e. basic germ cells, in the wrong place. Cancer progresses because there is lack of cancer-digesting enzymes in the body. The solution is to get pancreatic enzymes to the place where cancer is growing, in a concentration high enough to stop growth, but not so high as to cause too rapid production of "toxins" from tumor breakdown.

OTA Report: Summary and Policy Options, 13/1/2006
Hormonal treatment has been successful for types of cancer that are "hormone dependent," notably breast and prostate cancers. The theory behind hormonal, or endocrine, therapy, is that hormones produced internally are "blocked" by drugs. These drugs bind to receptors on the surface of tumor cells where the hormones would normally bind, but they do not cause the cell to grow or replicate. These drugs are generally taken for long periods of time following surgery to prevent metastatic disease.

Book Review: Chicken Soup & Other Folk Remedies, 21/2/2004
Page 89: "Bee pollen contains a combination of male and female hormones."

Page 92: "Licorice has female hormones in it."

Nutritional Supplements for Down Syndrome, 29/7/2003
Even before Down syndrome was found to be caused by a genetic abnormality, nutritional therapies were proposed, usually focusing on one or two items. Mixtures that included vitamins, hormones and enzymes were advocated in the 1960s by Haboud, a German physician ; however, other investigators found no beneficial effect .

Licastro F and others. Zinc affects the metabolism of thyroid hormones in children with Down syndrome. International Journal of Neuroscience 65:259-268, 1992.

Nutritional Supplements for Down Syndrome, 16/6/2002
Even before Down syndrome was found to be caused by a genetic abnormality, nutritional therapies were proposed, usually focusing on one or two items. Mixtures that included vitamins, hormones and enzymes were advocated in the 1960s by Haboud, a German physician ; however, other investigators found no beneficial effect .

Licastro F and others. Zinc affects the metabolism of thyroid hormones in children with Down syndrome. International Journal of Neuroscience 65:259-268, 1992.

Unnaturalistic Methods: S, 4/6/1997
Sexual Energy Massage: The "primary practice" of Bone Marrow Nei Kung. It involves simultaneous digital massage of one's genitals and "meditative breathing." The purported purpose of Sexual Energy Massage is to release "Ching Chi" from the genitals for dissemination in the body and absorption by the bones. "Ching Chi" is an alleged combination of sex hormones and "sexual energy" that can regenerate bone marrow.

Dardik, M.D. Its theory holds: (a) that "Wavenergy" ("waves of energy") is the language by which cells, hormones, genes, and molecules in the human body speak to one another; (b) that human behavior can direct cellular behavior; (c) that people can make "healthy waves" mostly through energy expenditure and "energy recovery"; and (d) that addictive behavior is simply an aberrant "wave pattern" or the absence of a wave.

How the "Urine Toxic Metals" Test Is Used to Defraud Patients, 5/12/2014
In October 2011, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation charges Usman wirh unprofessional conduct in her management of the Coman boy. The complaint states that she failed to obtain informed consent for his treatment, failed to maintain appropriate medical records, and prescribed chelation therapy, dietary supplements, hormones, enzymes, antifungal drugs, and various other treatments that have not been proven effective against autism .

Don't Trust Advice from Health Food Retailers!, 23/10/2014
In 1980, Sheldon S. Stoffer, M.D., and three associates from the Northland Thyroid Laboratory in Southfield, Michigan, described what happened when several of their employees consulted a supervisor or "nutritionist" at ten health-food stores. The investigators stated that their goiter was being treated with thyroid hormone and asked whether any of the store's products would help. All ten retailers said yes. Two advised stopping the hormone treatment, six advised taking kelp, two advised taking iodine tablets, two advised using a raw-gland preparation containing thyroid, parathyroid, pituitary and adrenal gland extracts, and one advised taking a raw thyroid preparation. (Health-food-store products made from animal glandular tissues are not legally permitted to contain potent amounts of hormones. Some do, however, but they are not reliable because the dosage is variable.) Other phony remedies included turnip tops, parsnips, parsley, malt tablets, and vitamin and mineral supplements .

The Dark Side of Linus Pauling's Legacy, 23/9/2014
Nevertheless, to test whether Pauling might be correct, the Mayo Clinic conducted three double-blind studies involving a total of 367 patients with advanced cancer. The studies, reported in 1979, 1983, and 1985, found that patients given 10,000 mg of vitamin C daily did no better than those given a placebo . Pauling criticized the first study, claiming that chemotherapeutic agents might have suppressed the patients' immune systems so that vitamin C couldn't work . But his 1976 report on Cameron's work stated clearly that: "All patients are treated initially in a perfectly conventional way, by operation, use of radiotherapy, and the administration of hormones and cytotoxic substances." And during a subsequent talk at the University of Arizona, he stated that vitamin C therapy could be used along with all conventional modalities . The participants in the 1983 study had not undergone conventional treatment, but Pauling dismissed its results anyway.

Questions and Answers, 16/9/2014
Before sending any question about herbs, dietary supplements, or hormones, please check our supplement/herb index page to see whether an article on this topic is available.


Limit of 25 files reached.

New Query: Rank by: